October 21, 2021

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Readout of Roundtable Event with Attorney General Barr and Members of State and Local Law Enforcement in Cheyenne, Wyoming

7 min read
<div>On Thursday, August 13th, Attorney General William P. Barr visited Cheyenne, Wyoming to lead a roundtable discussion with over 30 Wyoming police chiefs, sheriffs and other members of state and local law enforcement. The Attorney General was joined by U.S. Attorney Mark Klaassen, DEA Acting Director Tim Shea and Interim Director of Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation Forrest Williams. The Attorney General in his opening remarks conveyed his gratitude for the critical work local law enforcement officers do every day to protect their communities.</div>

On Thursday, August 13th, Attorney General William P. Barr visited Cheyenne, Wyoming to lead a roundtable discussion with over 30 Wyoming police chiefs, sheriffs and other members of state and local law enforcement. The Attorney General was joined by U.S. Attorney Mark Klaassen, DEA Acting Director Tim Shea and Interim Director of Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation Forrest Williams. The Attorney General in his opening remarks conveyed his gratitude for the critical work local law enforcement officers do every day to protect their communities.

The Attorney General affirmed the Justice Department’s commitment to our state and local law enforcement partners in working closely to help meet the specific needs and challenges of every community. During his remarks, the Attorney General announced that the Justice Department would be awarding $1 million in forensic grants to the Wyoming State Crime Lab that will support crime lab professionals, help analyze methamphetamine and synthetic drugs and increase data entry of DNA evidence from sex offenders to help protect Wyoming citizens from dangerous drugs, sexual perpetrators and violent criminals. The Attorney General then took questions from the law enforcement participants in a closed-press open dialogue discussion.

“The law enforcement mission is all about working together and supporting state and local policing efforts on the front lines,” said Attorney General William P. Barr. “I am proud, as all Americans should be, of the level of dedication and professionalism displayed by our state and local police forces. Recognizing that every policing community has varying and specific needs, the Justice Department will continue to offer tailored support to our local and state partners in their mission to keep their communities safe from harm.”

The Attorney General concluded his visit with a tour of the Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation Laboratory, where he was able to see first-hand the investigative resources this new grant funding will help expand and continue to keep Wyoming citizens safe.

Attorney General Barr at roundtable in Wyoming.

Photo courtesy of Michael Cummo/Wyoming Trubune Eagle

Attorney General Barr in a forensic lab in Wyoming on the right with a scientist on the left looking at chemicals in a fume hood.

Photo courtesy of Michael Cummo/Wyoming Trubune Eagle

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