September 25, 2021

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Former Rapides Parrish Corrections Officer Sentenced to 11 Months in Federal Prison for Assaulting Inmate

11 min read
<div>The Justice Department announced today that a former correctional officer with the Rapides Parish Sheriff’s Office (RPSO), Detention Center 1, in Alexandria, Louisiana, was sentenced today in federal court for assaulting an inmate detained at the facility.</div>

The Justice Department announced today that a former correctional officer with the Rapides Parish Sheriff’s Office (RPSO), Detention Center 1, in Alexandria, Louisiana, was sentenced today in federal court for assaulting an inmate detained at the facility.

Dominic Davidson, 27, was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge Dee Drell to 11 months in federal prison, followed by one year of supervised release. Davidson previously pleaded guilty on June 11, 2020, to one misdemeanor count of violating the civil rights of an inmate in his custody.

“Physical, violent, and unjustified abuse by members of our law enforcement community is unlawful,” said Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband for the Civil Rights Division. “The Justice Department is dedicated to ensuring that no one in this country is above the law and will continue to prosecute anyone who uses a position of power illegally to violate the civil rights of others.”

 “Correctional officers have a sworn duty to ensure that inmates are protected, rather than abused,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Alexander C. Van Hook for the Western District of Louisiana. “The abuse of authority by this law enforcement officer and the violation of the inmate’s civil rights will not be tolerated. We will continue to pursue cases where this type of abuse and indiscretion occurs”

“Along with our partners, the FBI will aggressively investigate allegations wherein correctional officers abuse their position of power and authority over prisoners to deny them their constitutional right to be free from cruel and unusual punishment,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge Bryan Vorndran. “The law suffers the most when those in a position of trust abuses their power. The FBI is appreciative of its partnerships with the Rapides Sheriff’s Office, the U.S. Attorney’s office of the Western District of Louisiana and the trial attorneys from the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division.” 

According to plea documents and information presented in court, on June 14, 2018, while on duty as a correctional officer, Davidson entered the locked holding cell of pretrial detainee K.F. and began punching K.F. repeatedly in the face and body. Prior to Davidson entering the cell, K.F., who was completely naked and locked securely inside his cell, had been banging on the door in an attempt to get officers’ attention. In response to the banging, Davidson put on a pair of rubber gloves, unlocked and entered K.F.’s cell, pushed K.F. to the ground, and struck K.F. numerous times in the head and body. At no point before, during, or after the assault did K.F. pose a threat to himself or others.

This case was investigated by the FBI. Assistant U.S. Attorney Mary Mudrick of the Western District of Louisiana and Trial Attorneys Katherine DeVar and Thomas Johnson of the Civil Rights Division are prosecuting the case.

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