October 21, 2021

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NASA to Hold Mars 2020 Perseverance Rover Launch Briefing

18 min read

Learn more about the agency’s next Red Planet mission during a live event on June 17.


NASA leadership and a panel of scientists and engineers will preview NASA’s next mission to the Red Planet, the Mars 2020 Perseverance rover, at a media briefing at 2 p.m. EDT (11 a.m. PDT) on Wednesday, June 17. The live briefing will stream on Facebook, Ustream, YouTube, Twitter, NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Perseverance is a robotic scientist weighing just under 2,300 pounds (1,043 kilograms). The rover’s astrobiology mission will search for signs of past microbial life on Mars, characterize the planet’s climate and geology, collect rock and soil samples for future return to Earth, and pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet.

Briefing participants will be:

  • NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine
  • Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington
  • Katie Stack Morgan, Perseverance deputy project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Southern California
  • Matt Wallace, Perseverance deputy project manager at JPL
  • Luis Dominguez, Perseverance deputy electrical integration and test lead at JPL
  • Omar Baez, launch director in NASA’s Launch Services Program at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida

Members of the media and the public may ask questions on social media during the briefing using #AskNASA.

The mission is scheduled to launch from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 9:15 a.m. EDT (6:15 a.m. PDT) July 20. The launch is managed by NASA’s Launch Services Program. It will land at Mars’ Jezero Crater on Feb. 18, 2021.

For more about Perseverance visit:

https://nasa.gov/perseverance

and

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

News Media Contact

Alana Johnson / Grey Hautaluoma
NASA Headquarters, Washington
202-672-4780 / 202-358-0668
alana.r.johnson@nasa.gov / grey.hautaluoma-1@nasa.gov

DC Agle
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
818-393-9011
agle@jpl.nasa.gov

2020-111

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