October 21, 2021

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Japan Travel Advisory

8 min read

Reconsider travel to Japan due to COVID-19.  

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.    

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Japan due to COVID-19. 

Japan has resumed most business operations (including day cares and schools). COVID-19 is still a serious concern in Tokyo and across many areas of Japan, and restrictions on entry remain in effect. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Japan. 

Read the country information page.

If you travel to Japan, you should:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.  
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.    
  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Discuss travel to Japan with your healthcare provider. Older adults and travelers with underlying health issues may be at risk for more severe disease.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands
  • Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at 60%–95% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Japan.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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