October 21, 2021

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Bankruptcy Filings Fall 11.8 Percent for Year Ending June 30

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<div>Despite a sharp rise in unemployment related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, personal and business bankruptcy filings fell 11.8 percent for the 12-month period ending June 30, 2020, according to statistics released by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.</div>

Despite a sharp rise in unemployment related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, personal and business bankruptcy filings fell 11.8 percent for the 12-month period ending June 30, 2020, according to statistics released by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. Annual bankruptcy filings totaled 682,363, compared with 773,361 cases in the year ending June 2019.

Business filings remained virtually identical to a year before, at 22,482. However, non-business bankruptcy filings fell by 12.1 percent, to 659,881 in the year ending June 30, 2020, compared with 750,878 in the year ending June 2019.

Bankruptcy filings tend to escalate gradually after an economic downturn starts. Following the Great Recession, new filings escalated over a two-year period until they peaked in 2010.

Some filing activity also may have been affected by pandemic-related disruptions to bankruptcy courts, many of which have limited public building access since mid-March. 

Business and Non-Business Filings,
Years Ending
June 30, 2016-2020
Year Business Non-Business Total
2020 22,482 659,881 682,363
2019 22,483 750,878 773,361
2018 22,245 753,333 775,578
2017 23,443 772,584 796,037
2016 25,227 793,932 819,159
Total Bankruptcy Filings By Chapter,
Years Ending
June 30, 2016-2020
Year Chapter
  7 11 12 13
2020 440,593 7,355 580 233,644
2019 479,043 7,007 535 286,635
2018 479,151 7,141 475 288,741
2017 489,011 6,999 482 299,398
2016 509,769 7,928 459 300,858

The following bankruptcy filings statistics tables are available: 

For more on bankruptcy and its chapters, view the following resources:

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