October 21, 2021

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Yemen National Day

12 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I offer bests wishes to the people of Yemen on the occasion of your 31st National Unity Day.  The United States appreciates the Republic of Yemen Government’s ongoing commitments towards achieving peace in Yemen.

An inclusive and lasting resolution of this conflict is a top priority for the United States.  I look forward to the continued engagement between our countries and other partners to achieve peace, and I affirm our commitment to helping bring about a prosperous future for all Yemenis.  May you enjoy a celebratory National Unity Day.

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