October 18, 2021

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Visit of Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa Jeffrey Feltman to Sudan

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Special Envoy for the Horn of Africa Jeffrey Feltman traveled to Khartoum from September 28 to October 1 to highlight the United States’ firm commitment to Sudan’s ongoing political transition, which represents a once-in-a-generation opportunity for democracy.

In his meetings with Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and the members of the Cabinet, Sovereign Council Chairman Abdelfattah al-Burhan and members of the Sovereign Council, and other political stakeholders, Special Envoy Feltman expressed the United States’ dedication to continued political and economic support as Sudan’s transition proceeds. He also underscored that such support depends on Sudan’s adherence to the agreed transitional order as established in the 2019 Constitutional Declaration and the 2020 Juba Peace Agreement. Deviation from this path and failure to meet key benchmarks will place at risk Sudan’s bilateral relationship with the United States, including significant U.S. assistance, as well as the prospect of security cooperation to modernize the Sudanese armed forces and U.S. support in the International Financial Institutions and for debt relief.

Special Envoy Feltman encouraged the Cabinet, the Sovereign Council, the Forces of Freedom and Change, and other stakeholders to uphold their responsibilities at this historic moment and reassure the Sudanese people that the aspirations of the revolution will be achieved, to avoid brinkmanship and mutual recrimination, and to make swift progress on key benchmarks in the Constitutional Declaration that would stabilize the transition. These include reaching consensus on the date of the transfer of the chair of the Sovereign Council to a civilian; beginning an inclusive process to develop a new vision for Sudan’s national security to guide the security sector reform agenda under civilian authority while recognizing the integral role that the armed forces will have in a democratic Sudan; establishing the Transitional Legislative Council; creating the legal and institutional framework for free and fair elections; and reconstituting the Constitutional Court and establishing mechanisms for transitional justice. It will be critical in this regard for the Sovereign Council to function as a collective body in discharging the duties assigned to it in the Constitutional Declaration. The United States will continue to closely monitor developments, in coordination with the Troika and our other partners in Europe, the United Nations, and the African Union.

Finally, Special Envoy Feltman thanked Prime Minister Hamdok, in his role as chairman of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), for his commitment to promoting a peaceful resolution of the conflict in Ethiopia, and they agreed on the urgency of a negotiated ceasefire and unhindered humanitarian access to all those who are suffering.

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