Uruguay Travel Advisory

Reconsider travel to Uruguay due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Uruguay due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.    

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a 3 Travel Health Notice for Uruguay due to COVID-19.   

Uruguay has resumed limited transportation options (including charter airport operations and some re-opening of borders for Uruguayan citizens and residents) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  Other improved conditions have been reported within Uruguay.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Uruguay. 

Violent crimes, such as homicides, armed robberies, carjackings, and thefts have increased throughout the country and occur in urban areas frequented by U.S. government personnel, day and night. Criminals commonly travel in pairs on motorcycles to approach unsuspecting victims with a weapon and demand personal belongings. Armed criminals also target grocery stores, restaurants, financial centers, and small businesses, in which innocent bystanders are often victimized.  

Please read the country information page

If you decide to travel to Uruguay:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.  
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Be aware of your surroundings especially when traveling to tourist locations or poorly lit areas.
  • Call 911 if you encounter a crime in progress. Do not physically resist any robbery attempt or try to stop a robbery in progress.
  • Be vigilant when visiting banks or using ATMs during non-daylight hours or in remote locations; criminals often target ATMs and businesses in the early morning hours.
  • Do not leave valuable objects in parked vehicles or in plain sight when driving.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive jewelry or watches.
  • Review your personal and residential security plans.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Uruguay.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations; review the Traveler’s Checklist

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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    The Justice Department today announced its plans for voting rights monitoring in jurisdictions around the country for the Nov. 3, 2020 general election. The Justice Department historically has monitored in jurisdictions in the field on election day, and is again doing so this year. The department will also take complaints from the public nationwide regarding possible violations of the federal voting rights laws through its call center.  
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  • Venezuelan Business Executive Charged in Connection with International Bribery and Money Laundering Scheme
    In Crime News
    A dual Venezuelan-Italian citizen who controlled multiple companies via U.S. based bank accounts was charged in an indictment returned Tuesday for his role in laundering the proceeds of inflated contracts that were obtained by making bribe payments to officials at Venezuela’s state-owned and state-controlled energy company Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA).
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  • U.S. Welcomes First Meeting of the Afghanistan High Council for National Reconciliation Leadership Committee
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Young Giant Planet Offers Clues to Formation of Exotic Worlds
    In Space
    Jupiter-size planets [Read More…]
  • Joint Press Statement on the 11th U.S.-Japan Policy Cooperation Dialogue on the Internet Economy
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Military Personnel: Perspectives on DOD’s and the Military Services’ Use of Borrowed Military Personnel
    In U.S GAO News
    Policies on the use of borrowed military personnel vary among military services. Borrowed military personnel refers to military personnel used for duties outside their assigned positions, such as security protection. DOD policy acknowledges that there may be instances in which military personnel can be used to appropriately satisfy a near-term demand but that DOD must be vigilant in ensuring that military personnel are not inappropriately utilized, particularly in a manner that may degrade readiness. Additionally, the Army and the Marine Corps have their own policies that describes how military personnel may be used on a temporary basis. DOD and the Army, Navy, and Air Force do not centrally track their use of borrowed military personnel, nor do they assess any impacts of that use on the readiness of units and personnel to accomplish their assigned missions. According to DOD and Army officials, the relatively limited use of borrowed military manpower, their limited impacts on readiness, and the existence of other readiness reporting mechanisms serve to obviate the need to collect and analyze this information centrally—especially given the resources that would be required to establish and maintain such a reporting process. The House Armed Services Committee has questioned whether DOD continues to divert servicemembers from their unit assignments to perform nonmilitary functions that could be performed by civilian employees. House Report 116-120, accompanying a bill for the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 included a provision for GAO to assess the levels and impacts of borrowed military personnel. This report examines DOD's and the military services' policies on the use of borrowed military personnel, the tracking and reporting of their use of borrowed military personnel, and any impacts of that use on readiness. For more information, contact Cary Russell at (202)512-5431 or RussellC@gao.gov.
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  • Former NGO Procurement Official Pleads Guilty to Bribery
    In Crime News
    A former non-governmental organization (NGO) procurement official pleaded guilty today to paying bribes to NGO procurement officers in exchange for sensitive procurement information related to NGO contracts funded in part by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). These contracts were for the procurement of food and supplies that would ultimately be provided to those affected by various humanitarian crises, including refugees displaced by the conflict in Syria.
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  • Romania National Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Files Complaint to Stop Distribution of Unapproved, Misbranded, and Adulterated “Poly-MVA” Products
    In Crime News
    The United States filed a civil complaint to stop a California company from distributing unapproved and misbranded drugs and adulterated animal drugs, the Department of Justice announced today.
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  • Connecticut Man Charged with Assaulting an Officer During U.S. Capitol Breach
    In Crime News
    A Connecticut man was charged yesterday in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia with assaulting an officer during the breach of the U.S. Capitol grounds on Jan. 6, 2021. He will be presented in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York today, before appearing in Washington D.C. 
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