Updated – Secretary Pompeo’s Travel to India, Sri Lanka, Maldives, Indonesia, and Vietnam

Morgan Ortagus, Department Spokesperson

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo will travel to New Delhi, India; Colombo, Sri Lanka; Malé, Maldives; Jakarta, Indonesia; and Hanoi, Vietnam October 25 – 30.

In New Delhi, Secretary Pompeo and Secretary of Defense Mark T. Esper and their Indian counterparts will lead the third annual U.S.-India 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue to advance the U.S.-India Comprehensive Global Strategic Partnership and expand cooperation to promote stability and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific and the world.

Secretary Pompeo will travel to Colombo to underscore the commitment of the United States to a partnership with a strong, sovereign Sri Lanka and to advance our common goals for a free and open Indo-Pacific region.

Thereafter, Secretary Pompeo will travel to Malé to reaffirm our close bilateral relationship and advance our partnership on issues ranging from regional maritime security to the fight against terrorism.

The Secretary will travel to Jakarta to deliver public remarks and meet with his Indonesian counterparts to affirm the two countries’ vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific.

Secretary Pompeo will then travel to Hanoi to meet with counterparts to reaffirm the strength of the U.S.-Vietnam Comprehensive Partnership and promote our shared commitment to a peaceful and prosperous region.

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