Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs David Hale Addresses the International Coalition for the Sahel Ministerial

Office of the Spokesperson

On March 19, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs David Hale addressed the International Coalition for the Sahel Ministerial, outlining the enduring U.S. commitment to work with our partners to bring security, stability, and good governance to the region.  Under Secretary Hale delivered remarks alongside the Coalition’s High Representative Djime Adoum, partners from the G5 Sahel and member states, and international partners, highlighting the importance of coordinating the international response to insecurity and instability in the Sahel in support of African institutions and initiatives.

The Under Secretary also announced that the United States will provide more than $80 million in additional humanitarian assistance to the Sahel region.  As one of the largest donors of life-saving assistance to the region, the United States remains dedicated to supporting efforts to address the growing humanitarian crisis and alleviate the suffering of the people of the Sahel.

Read Under Secretary Hale’s remarks as delivered. For further information, please contact af-press@state.gov.

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