October 21, 2021

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U.S. Special Envoy for Yemen Lenderking’s Travel to Saudi Arabia and Oman

13 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

U.S. Special Envoy for Yemen Tim Lenderking will travel to Saudi Arabia and Oman on April 29, where he will hold meetings with senior government officials and work jointly with UN Special Envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths. U.S. Special Envoy Lenderking’s discussions will focus on ensuring the regular and unimpeded delivery of commodities and humanitarian assistance throughout Yemen, promoting a lasting ceasefire, and transitioning the parties to a political process. The U.S. Special Envoy will build on the international consensus to halt the Houthi offensive on Marib, which only worsens the humanitarian crisis threatening the Yemeni people.

For any questions, please contact Vanessa Vidal at NEA-Press@state.gov and follow us on Twitter @StateDept_NEA.

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