October 21, 2021

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U.S. Special Envoy for Yemen Lenderking’s Travel to Saudi Arabia

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Office of the Spokesperson

U.S. Special Envoy for Yemen Tim Lenderking arrived in Saudi Arabia today, where he will meet with senior officials from the Saudi and Republic of Yemen Governments.  Special Envoy Lenderking will discuss the growing consequences of the Houthi offensive on Marib, which is exacerbating the humanitarian crisis and triggering instability elsewhere in the country.  The Special Envoy will address the urgent need for efforts by the Republic of Yemen Government and Saudi Arabia to stabilize Yemen’s economy and to facilitate the timely import of fuel to northern Yemen, and the need for the Houthis to end their manipulation of fuel imports and prices inside of Yemen.  Finally, Special Envoy Lenderking will meet with representatives from the international community and the UN Office of the Special Envoy for Yemen to discuss the importance of an inclusive peace process and a rapid appointment of a new UN Envoy.  Now is the time to stop the fighting and enable Yemenis to shape a more peaceful, prosperous future for their country.

For any questions, please contact NEA-Press@state.gov and follow us on Twitter @StateDept_NEA.

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