September 27, 2021

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U.S. Special Envoy for Yemen Lenderking’s Return from Saudi Arabia

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Office of the Spokesperson

U.S. Special Envoy for Yemen Tim Lenderking returned from travel to Saudi Arabia today. Lenderking met with senior officials from the Republic of Yemen and Saudi governments, the Gulf Cooperation Council, the international community, and the UN Special Envoy’s Office.

During this trip, Lenderking called for an end to the stalemated fighting in Marib and across Yemen, which have only increased the suffering of the Yemeni people. He expressed concern that the Houthis continue to refuse to engage meaningfully on a ceasefire and political talks and stressed that only through a durable agreement between the Yemeni parties can the dire humanitarian crisis in the country be reversed.

During his meetings, Lenderking called for the Republic of Yemen Government and Southern Transitional Council to come together to improve services and stabilize the economy. A critical first step is ensuring the conditions necessary for the return of the cabinet to Aden. He also discussed immediate actions that must be taken to ease the humanitarian and economic crisis, including increasing fuel imports, ending manipulation of fuel and prices, and mobilizing additional economic and humanitarian aid for the country.

For any questions, please contact NEA-Press@state.gov and follow us on Twitter @StateDept_NEA.

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