October 19, 2021

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U.S.-ROK Director General/Deputy-Level Consultation Meeting

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Office of the Spokesperson

U.S. Deputy Special Representative for the DPRK Dr. Jung Pak hosted the first interagency U.S.-Republic of Korea (ROK) Director General/Deputy-Level Consultation (DLC) meeting with Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Unification, and Blue House officials, along with National Security Council, Treasury, and Defense participants on August 4. The two sides discussed the current situation on the Korean Peninsula; prospects for humanitarian cooperation; and coordination on DPRK issues with stakeholders in other multilateral fora, including trilateral cooperation with Japan.

This DLC meeting illustrated the U.S. and ROK commitment to ongoing cooperation on DPRK issues and emphasized the importance of such coordination as we seek to advance complete denuclearization and permanent peace on the Korean Peninsula.

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