U.S. Engagement with the UN Population Fund (UNFPA)

Office of the Spokesperson

Since the January 28, 2021 Presidential Memorandum on Protecting Women’s Health at Home and Abroad, the United States has been re-engaging with UNFPA in support of its essential work to address preventable maternal deaths and the unmet need for family planning, and prevent and respond to gender-based violence and harmful practices around the world.  Our re-engagement directly benefits communities around the globe, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Some of the efforts that have taken place or are currently underway include:

  • Revitalizing High-Level Engagement: On June 7, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield met with UNFPA Executive Director Dr. Natalie Kanem.  This meeting represents the top-level U.S. government commitment to rebuilding U.S. support for UNFPA, implementing the directive of the January 28 Presidential Memorandum to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights.
  • Restoring Core Funding: The U.S. Department of State is taking the necessary steps to provide $30.8 million to UNFPA in Fiscal Year 2021.
  • Responding to the Rohingya Refugee Crisis: Some $2.6 million of the nearly $155 million in U.S. humanitarian assistance announced on May 18, 2021 will support UNFPA operations in responding to this crisis.
  • Responding to the Tigray Humanitarian Crisis: Nearly $1.2 million in U.S. humanitarian assistance for UNFPA will increase support for crisis-affected women who have fled the violence and instability in Ethiopia’s Tigray region to seek safe haven in Sudan.
  • Responding to Humanitarian Needs in Afghanistan: Nearly $1.5 million of the more than $266 million in U.S. humanitarian assistance announced on June 4, 2021 will support UNFPA operations as part of our commitment to international protection in Afghanistan, particularly for Afghan returnees and internally displaced persons.
  • Responding to Humanitarian Needs in Sudan: Some $1.3 million in humanitarian assistance in Sudan for a strengthened and coordinated multi-sectoral response to gender-based violence to support internally displaced persons and vulnerable populations.

For further information, please contact PRMPress@state.gov.

 

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Over half of schools reported on their websites that amounts were based on individual circumstances, such as students’ general financial need, access to essential items such as food or housing, or a combination of these factors. About 20 percent of schools also reported using full-time or part-time status to determine aid amounts. For example, a 4-year public school reported that it distributed grants, ranging from $150 to $1,000, to all eligible students based on their enrollment status and financial need based on students’ FAFSA information. Why GAO Did This Study In June 2020, GAO issued the first of a series of reports on federal efforts to address the pandemic, which included a discussion of HEERF student aid grants to schools. At that time, limited information on how schools distributed HEERF funds to students was available. This report provides additional information and examines (1) how HEERF emergency student aid funds were provided to schools under the CARES Act, and (2) how schools distributed emergency student aid to eligible students. GAO analyzed Education’s obligation data as of November 2020, after Education had obligated most of the HEERF emergency student aid funds. GAO also analyzed information about HEERF student aid that Education requires schools to report on their websites by selecting a generalizable random sample of 203 schools for website reviews. These schools were representative of the more than 4,500 schools that received HEERF student aid funds as of August 2020. GAO also collected non-generalizable narrative details about how schools distributed funds to eligible students.
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