U.S. Commends Slovenia for Designating Hizballah

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

This week, Slovenia designated Hizballah in its entirety as a terrorist organization, rejecting the false distinction between Hizballah’s political and military wings.  As the Slovenian Ministry of Foreign Affairs stated, Hizballah is a criminal and terrorist organization posing a global threat to peace and security.  The United States commends Slovenia for taking this step forward to help prevent Hizballah from operating in Europe.

Since day one, the Trump administration has engaged in sustained diplomatic engagement to persuade the international community to take a clear-eyed look at Hizballah’s malign activity and take action to prevent Iran-backed Hizballah from operating in their territories.  We’ve placed particular emphasis on Europe, and the State Department-led diplomatic campaign has yielded results, with six European countries imposing restrictions on Hizballah over the past year, and other European governments considering new measures.  We welcome these steps by Slovenia and other European countries.

More from: Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

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  • Bankruptcy Filings Fall 11.8 Percent for Year Ending June 30
    In U.S Courts
    Despite a sharp rise in unemployment related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, personal and business bankruptcy filings fell 11.8 percent for the 12-month period ending June 30, 2020, according to statistics released by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.
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    In Travel
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  • Secretary Blinken’s Call with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken and Israeli Foreign Minister Gabi Ashkenazi Before Their Meeting
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Marketing Company Agrees to Pay $150 Million for Facilitating Elder Fraud Schemes
    In Crime News
    Epsilon Data Management LLC (Epsilon), one of the largest marketing companies in the world, has entered into a settlement with the Department of Justice to resolve a criminal charge for selling millions of Americans’ information to perpetrators of elder fraud schemes.
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  • Sierra Leone National Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • Indiana Man Sentenced to 46 Months in Prison for Making Racially Motivated Threats Toward Black Neighbor and for Unlawfully Possessing Firearms
    In Crime News
    An Indiana man was sentenced Friday in federal court for making racially motivated threats to intimidate and interfere with his neighbor, who is Black, in violation of the criminal provision of the Fair Housing Act, and for unlawfully possessing firearms.
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    In Space
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  • Department Press Briefing – March 8, 2021
    In Crime Control and Security News
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  • North Carolina Tax Preparer Charged with Conspiracy to Defraud the IRS and Aggravated Identity Theft
    In Crime News
    A federal grand jury in Durham, North Carolina, returned an indictment yesterday charging a tax preparer with conspiring to defraud the United States, preparing false tax returns, filing a false personal tax return, and committing aggravated identity theft, announced Acting Deputy Assistant Attorney General Stuart M. Goldberg of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney Matthew G.T. Martin for the Middle District of North Carolina.
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  • Justice Department Defends Health Care Workers from Being Forced to Perform Abortions with Vermont Lawsuit
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division today filed a civil lawsuit in Vermont federal court against the University of Vermont Medical Center (UVMMC) for violating the federal anti-discrimination statute known as the “Church Amendments.” That statute prohibits health care entities like UVMMC from discriminating against health care workers who follow their conscience and refuse to perform or assist with abortions.
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  • Operation Legend: Case of the Day
    In Crime News
    Each weekday, the Department of Justice will highlight a case that has resulted from Operation Legend. Today’s case is out of the Northern District of Ohio. Operation Legend launched in Cleveland on July 29, 2020, in response to the city facing increased homicide and non-fatal shooting rates.
    [Read More…]