September 25, 2021

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U.S. Commends Slovenia for Designating Hizballah

11 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

This week, Slovenia designated Hizballah in its entirety as a terrorist organization, rejecting the false distinction between Hizballah’s political and military wings.  As the Slovenian Ministry of Foreign Affairs stated, Hizballah is a criminal and terrorist organization posing a global threat to peace and security.  The United States commends Slovenia for taking this step forward to help prevent Hizballah from operating in Europe.

Since day one, the Trump administration has engaged in sustained diplomatic engagement to persuade the international community to take a clear-eyed look at Hizballah’s malign activity and take action to prevent Iran-backed Hizballah from operating in their territories.  We’ve placed particular emphasis on Europe, and the State Department-led diplomatic campaign has yielded results, with six European countries imposing restrictions on Hizballah over the past year, and other European governments considering new measures.  We welcome these steps by Slovenia and other European countries.

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