October 26, 2021

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Togo’s National Day

16 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I congratulate all Togolese on the occasion of your 61st National Day.

The United States and Togo enjoy a strong partnership that promotes peace and stability, economic prosperity for all, and sound democratic principles.  We commend the Government of Togo for their efforts to combat COVID-19 and protect public health and well-being.

The United States and Togo’s neighbors in the region value Togo’s efforts and sacrifices to help ensure security in West Africa, especially through contributions to the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission on Mali (MINUSMA).

I send best wishes to the people of Togo as you celebrate your National Day.  We look forward to working with you in the year ahead to make Togo and West Africa more secure, prosperous, and resilient.

 

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