September 28, 2021

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Togo Travel Advisory

14 min read

Reconsider travel to Togo due to COVID-19.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory. 

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.    

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Togo due to COVID-19.     

Togo has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Togo.  

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Northern border region adjacent to Burkina Faso due to potential for terrorism and kidnapping.

Exercise Increased Caution In:

  • Areas north of Kande due to potential for terrorism.
  • The cities of Sokodé, Bafilo, and Mango due to civil unrest.

Read the country information page.  

If you decide to travel to Togo:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Click HERE to see a map.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Togo.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Northern Border Region – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Extremist groups have carried out attacks, including kidnapping, in adjacent areas of Burkina Faso and Benin. Attacks may occur with little or no warning.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in areas north and northeast of the city of Dapaong as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to these areas.

North of Kande – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Extremist groups have carried out attacks in nearby areas of Benin. Attacks may occur with little or no warning.

The Cities of Sokodé, Bafilo, and Mango – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

There is a history of violent demonstrations in Sokodé, Bafilo, and Mango, during which protesters and security force members have been injured, and some killed. Police have used tear gas to disperse demonstrations that caused traffic disruptions in city centers and along National Route 1, and arrested demonstrators. Security forces have at times used excessive force to disperse crowds. Authorities have interrupted internet and cellular data services during past protests, making communication difficult and unpredictable. 

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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