Timor-Leste National Day

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I would like to extend our congratulations on the celebration of Timor-Leste’s Restoration of Independence Day.  During the 19 years since independence has been restored, Timor-Leste has made enormous progress to build democratic institutions and ensure human rights are upheld.  The United States has been proud to partner with Timor-Leste since its independence and we look forward to advancing and strengthening our strong bilateral relationship.

Our relationship maintains shared values of mutual respect, friendship, and cooperation. These shared values provide the foundation for continued collaboration to promote democracy, human rights, and improving the lives of the Timorese people.  While the past year has presented challenges, including the COVID-19 pandemic, I am confident that the spirit of cooperation between Timor-Leste and the United States will endure and that brighter days are ahead for both of our countries.

As a friend and partner, the United States congratulates the people of Timor-Leste on your Restoration of Independence Day.

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