The United States Welcomes Major Milestone in Afghanistan Peace Negotiations

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States welcomes the Agreement announced today by the negotiating teams from the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban.  This Agreement is a major milestone in the Afghanistan Peace Negotiations that have been underway since September 12, 2020.

The Agreement codifies the rules and procedures the two sides have been negotiating since the start of talks.  The teams made a number of important decisions that will guide their negotiations on a political roadmap and a comprehensive ceasefire.

We congratulate both sides on their perseverance and willingness to find common ground.  This achievement demonstrates that the Afghan Islamic Republic and Taliban are serious, able to overcome differences, and ready to deal with difficult issues.  What has been achieved provides hope they will succeed in reaching a political settlement to this more than forty-year-old conflict.  The United States thanks Qatar for its role as host and facilitator of the talks.

Rapid progress on a political roadmap and a ceasefire is what the people of Afghanistan want more than anything else.  The United States, along with most of the international community, will continue to support the peace process in pursuit of this goal.  As negotiations on a political roadmap and permanent ceasefire begin, we will also work hard with all sides in pursuit of a serious reduction of violence and ceasefire.

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