The United States Takes Further Actions against the Burmese Military Regime

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

In response to the brutal campaign of violence perpetrated by the Burmese military regime and to continue imposing costs in connection with the military coup, the U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Assets Control is designating today 22 individuals connected to the regime, pursuant to Executive Order 14014 “Blocking Property With Respect to the Situation in Burma.” These include three additional State Administration Council (SAC) members and four military-appointed cabinet members, as well as 15 adult children or spouses of previously designated Burmese military officials whose financial networks have contributed to military officials’ ill-gotten gains.

In addition, the U.S. Department of Commerce is adding Wanbao Mining, Ltd., two of its subsidiaries, and King Royal Technologies to its Entity List.  These entities provide revenue and/or other support to the Burmese military, and Wanbao Mining and its subsidiaries have long been implicated in labor rights violations and human rights abuses, including at the Letpadaung copper mine.

Today’s measures further demonstrate that we will continue to take additional action against, and impose costs on, the military and its leaders until they reverse course and provide for a return to democracy.

The United States is committed to promoting accountability for the Burmese military, the SAC, and all those who have provided support for the military coup. The United States will continue to urge the Burmese military to fully cooperate in expeditious implementation of the ASEAN Five Point Consensus, and immediately restore Burma’s path to democracy.  The United States will remain a steadfast advocate for the people of Burma’s ability to determine the future of their country.

For more information about today’s action, see Treasury’s press release   and Commerce’s press release. 

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