October 21, 2021

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The United States Stands with France in the Fight Against Terrorism

8 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States condemns unequivocally the militant attack on Friday that led to the death of a French soldier near Gossi in northern Mali. The tragic loss underscores the sacrifice so many soldiers have made for security in the Sahel. The United States extends its condolences to the people of France. 

 

We stand firmly beside our close ally France and continue to partner with Mali on its path back to democracy and stability. 

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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