September 22, 2021

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The United States Condemns Houthi Attack Against Saudi Arabia   

8 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States condemns the latest Houthi missile attack against Saudi Arabia that struck the Eastern Province on September 4, injuring two children and damaging several homes.  This is completely unacceptable.  These attacks threaten the lives of the Kingdom’s residents, including more than 70,000 U.S. citizens.

We once again urge the Houthis to agree to a comprehensive ceasefire immediately and to stop these cross-border attacks and attacks inside of Yemen, particularly their offensive on Marib, which is exacerbating the humanitarian crisis and prolonging the conflict.  The Houthis must begin working toward a peaceful, diplomatic solution under UN auspices to end this conflict.

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