September 27, 2021

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The United States Announces New Humanitarian Aid for the People of Somalia

8 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States is providing nearly $199 million in additional humanitarian assistance for the people of Somalia who have faced decades of chronic food insecurity, violence, and cycles of drought and flooding—the impacts of which have all been compounded by desert locusts and the COVID-19 pandemic. This additional funding, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Department of State, brings the total U.S. humanitarian assistance for the people of Somalia to more than  $408 million for Fiscal Year 2021.

This assistance will help many of the nearly six million people of Somalia in need of humanitarian aid, including three million displaced people inside Somalia as well as nearly 500,000 Somali refugees in Djibouti, Ethiopia, and Kenya.  This new funding will provide emergency food and nutrition assistance, safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene, shelter, protection, education, and health care, as well as logistics and other support, in the face of worsening environmental, humanitarian, and conflict related challenges.

The United States is the largest single donor of humanitarian aid in Somalia and for Somali refugees in the region, and we welcome efforts by the UN to draw attention to the plight of the people of Somalia.  We remain concerned about the continuing increase in humanitarian needs, and we urge other donors to contribute to the international response and provide the support needed to save lives.

For the latest updates on U.S. humanitarian assistance for the people of Somalia, visit:  https://www.usaid.gov/humanitarian-assistance/somalia.  For media inquiries, please email PRMPress@state.gov and press@usaid.gov.

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