The United States and Japan Reaffirm Strong Ties and Shared Democratic Values

Office of the Spokesperson

“Japan and the United States continue to strengthen our steadfast alliance every day, drawing on our common values and interests to advance a shared vision for a free and open Indo-Pacific.”

– U.S. Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo, February 21, 2020

U.S. Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo will travel to Tokyo, Japan, October 5-7 to promote the U.S.-Japan Alliance as a force for transparency, accountability, openness, prosperity, and peace in the Indo-Pacific and around the world.

A SHARED VISION FOR A FREE AND OPEN INDO-PACIFIC

  • The U.S.-Japan relationship is the cornerstone of peace, security, and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific. Our decades-long alliance is built on a foundation of shared commitment to democracy, human rights, economic development, and security, in addition to our vibrant and extensive people-to-people ties.
  • The alliance is also based on vital interests and values that we hold in common, including: the maintenance of stability in the Indo-Pacific region; the preservation and promotion of political and economic freedoms; respect for human rights and support for democratic institutions; and the expansion of prosperity for the peoples of both countries and the international community as a whole.
  • The United States and Japan cooperate on a broad range of global issues, including development assistance, global health, environmental and resource protection, and women’s empowerment. We also work together to promote integrity in Information and Communications Technology supply chains and to ensure a secure transition to 5G networks.  We collaborate broadly in science and technology, with joint initiatives that have led to new ideas and advancements in fields as varied as infectious diseases, particle physics, advanced computing, fusion plasma, materials discovery, neuroscience, space, cancer biology, and natural disaster resiliency.  We are strengthening our already strong people-to-people ties in education, science, and other areas.
  • Japan and the United States are also making progress toward our shared vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific region through partnerships such as the Japan-U.S. Strategic Energy Partnership (JUSEP), Japan-U.S. Strategic Digital Economy Partnership (JUSDEP), and the Japan-U.S.-Mekong Power Partnership (JUMPP).

ECONOMIC TIES THAT BENEFIT THE AMERICAN AND JAPANESE PEOPLE

  • The U.S.-Japan bilateral economic relationship is one of strongest and broadest economic partnerships in the world and features substantial trade and investment flows. The United States and Japan are top trading partners, exchanging $300 billion worth of goods and services each year.  The United States is Japan’s top source of direct investment, and Japan is the top investor in the United States, with $644.7 billion invested in 2019 across all 50 states.  Japanese-owned firms support 885,000 jobs in the United States.  Both countries acknowledge the important role of women as drivers of economic progress in all sectors.
  • The U.S.-Japan Trade Agreement that entered into force on January 1, 2020, provides important new market access that benefits both the United States and Japan, including eliminating or reducing tariffs on approximately $7.2 billion in U.S. agricultural exports. The U.S.-Japan Digital Trade Agreement that entered into force the same day includes high-standard provisions that ensure data can be transferred across borders without restrictions, guarantee consumer privacy protections, promote adherence to common principles for addressing cyber security challenges, support effective use of encryption technologies, and boost digital trade.

SECURITY COOPERATION THAT PROMOTES PEACE AND STABILITY

  • For more than 60 years, the U.S.-Japan Alliance has served as the cornerstone of peace, stability, and freedom in the Indo-Pacific region. The U.S. commitment to the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty of 1960 is unwavering.
  • The United States and Japan continue to address shared regional and global objectives by enhancing our security cooperation within the U.S.-Japan Alliance, affirming a rules-based approach and respect for international law, including the Law of the Sea, and deepening United States, Japan, and Republic of Korea trilateral cooperation in the face of the DPRK’s dangerous and illicit nuclear and ballistic missile programs.
  • The depth of the U.S. commitment to the U.S.-Japan Alliance is evidenced by the approximately 55,000 U.S. military personnel stationed in Japan, and the thousands of Department of Defense civilians and family members who live and work alongside them. The United States has also deployed its most capable and advanced military assets to Japan, including the USS Ronald Reagan carrier strike group and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

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    Bureau of Oceans and [Read More…]
  • Bangladesh Travel Advisory
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  • DRL FY19 Supporting Transitional Justice in Burma
    In Human Health, Resources and Services
    Bureau of Democracy, [Read More…]
  • Tanzania Union Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Secretary Blinken’s Call with Dominican Republic Foreign Minister Alvarez
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Eight Individuals Charged With Conspiring to Act as Illegal Agents of the People’s Republic of China
    In Crime News
    A complaint and arrest warrants were unsealed today in federal court in Brooklyn charging eight defendants with conspiring to act in the United States as illegal agents of the People’s Republic of China (PRC).  Six defendants also face related charges of conspiring to commit interstate and international stalking.  The defendants, allegedly acting at the direction and under the control of PRC government officials, conducted surveillance of and engaged in a campaign to harass, stalk, and coerce certain residents of the United States to return to the PRC as part of a global, concerted, and extralegal repatriation effort known as “Operation Fox Hunt.” 
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  • William M. Kelly, M.D., Inc And Omega Imaging, Inc. Agree To Pay $5 Million To Resolve Alleged False Claims For Unsupervised And Unaccredited Radiology Services
    In Crime News
    William M. Kelly Inc. and Omega Imaging Inc., together, operate 11 radiology facilities in Southern California, have agreed to pay the United States $5 million to resolve allegations that they violated the False Claims Act (FCA) by knowingly submitting claims to Medicare and the military healthcare program, TRICARE, for unsupervised radiology services and services provided at unaccredited facilities, the Department of Justice announced today.
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  • Department Press Briefing – March 17, 2021
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Jalina Porter, Principal [Read More…]
  • Fort Bend County home health owner charged with copying and pasting doctor signatures
    In Justice News
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  • Austria Travel Advisory
    In Travel
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  • Sudan’s State Sponsor of Terrorism Designation Rescinded
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Department of Justice Issues Positive Business Review Letter to Companies Developing Plasma Therapies for Covid-19
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice announced today that it has no intention to challenge proposed efforts by Baxalta US Inc., Emergent BioSolutions Inc., Grifols Therapeutics LLC, and CSL Plasma Inc. (together, the “Requesting Parties”) to assist the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) in designing quality standards for collecting COVID-19 convalescent plasma.
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  • International Statement: End-To-End Encryption and Public Safety
    In Crime News
    We, the undersigned, [Read More…]
  • Disqualification of Pan-Democratic Lawmakers in Hong Kong
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Two Iranian Nationals Charged in Cyber Theft Campaign Targeting Computer Systems in United States, Europe, and the Middle East
    In Crime News
    Two Iranian nationals have been charged in connection with a coordinated cyber intrusion campaign – sometimes at the behest of the government of the Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran) – targeting computers in New Jersey, elsewhere in the United States, Europe and the Middle East, the Department of Justice announced today.
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  • Political Donor Sentenced to 12 Years in Prison for Lobbying and Campaign Contribution Crimes, Tax Evasion, and Obstruction of Justice
    In Crime News
    A venture capitalist and political fundraiser was sentenced today to 144 months in federal prison for falsifying records to conceal his work as a foreign agent while lobbying high-level U.S. government officials, evading the payment of millions of dollars in taxes, making illegal campaign contributions, and obstructing a federal investigation into the source of donations to a presidential inauguration committee. Imaad Shah Zuberi, 50, of Arcadia, California, was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Virginia A. Phillips, who also ordered him to pay $15,705,080 in restitution and a criminal fine of $1.75 million.
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  • Justice Department Again to Monitor Compliance with the Federal Voting Rights Laws on Election Day
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department today announced its plans for voting rights monitoring in jurisdictions around the country for the Nov. 3, 2020 general election. The Justice Department historically has monitored in jurisdictions in the field on election day, and is again doing so this year. The department will also take complaints from the public nationwide regarding possible violations of the federal voting rights laws through its call center.  
    [Read More…]