September 28, 2021

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The President’s National Space Policy

19 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The President’s National Space Policy , released yesterday, outlines America’s principles and goals regarding our national interests and activities in space. The policy reaffirms America’s leadership in outer space, emphasizes the importance of the commercial space sector to economic growth, and reaffirms the importance of all nations acting responsibly for the safety, stability, security, and long-term sustainability of space activities. While the United States would prefer that the space domain remain free of conflict, we will be prepared to meet and overcome any challenges that arise, while promoting burden sharing and marshaling cooperative responses to threats. In collaboration with other U.S. government agencies and private sector partners, the Department of State will:

  • Demonstrate U.S. leadership in international fora to strengthen deterrence and contribute to international security and stability;
  • Encourage and uphold the right of nations to responsibly and peacefully use space, while identifying and resolving behaviors that threaten that right;
  • Encourage other nations to adopt regulations and practices for the commercial space sector which encourage transparent, private sector opportunities and reduce costs associated with unnecessary regulatory differences;
  • Facilitate new commercial market opportunities for U.S. space capabilities and services;
  • Expand a U.S.-led coalition of space exploration partners to return humans to the Moon for long-term exploration and utilization, followed by human missions to Mars and other destinations.
  • Encourage international support for the responsible recovery and use of outer space resources;
  • Continue to promote safe and responsible space activities in earth’s orbit, including the implementation of orbital debris mitigation guidelines and long-term sustainability guidelines completed through the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS);
  • Promote full, open, and timely access to government-derived space environmental data on a reciprocal basis; and
  • Work closely with allies and partners around the globe to identify areas of mutual interest and benefit – including collective self-defense and the promotion of secure and resilient space systems and space-related infrastructure.

In implementing this new policy, the Department of State will build on its history of supporting the peaceful exploration and utilization of outer space, consistent with the Outer Space Treaty of 1967.

More from: Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

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