October 21, 2021

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The Presidential Determination on Refugee Admissions for Fiscal Year 2022

20 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

President Biden today affirmed the United States’ deeply-held commitment to welcoming refugees by issuing the Presidential Determination on Refugee Admissions, which raises the refugee admissions target to 125,000 for Fiscal Year 2022.  The United States is, and will continue to be, a global leader in international humanitarian response, including in refugee resettlement.  Not only are we the largest single humanitarian donor, but we also seek to promote stability in regions experiencing crisis, advance protection and durable solutions for refugees, and facilitate international collaboration to address global refugee and humanitarian crises.  In Fiscal Year 2020, the United States provided more than $10.5 billion in humanitarian assistance, including assistance for refugees.

In my consultations with Members of Congress, I underscored that the State Department is committed to rebuilding our U.S. Refugee Admissions Program in line with our long tradition of offering hope and safe haven to those fleeing persecution.  We are diligently working to rebuild the infrastructure of the program, including by strengthening our refugee processing systems, providing for new funding at the local and state levels to enhance the capacity of our domestic resettlement partners, and expanding community sponsorship programs.

In our history as a nation, we have resettled more than 3.1 million refugees, and we are now also in the midst of safely welcoming in the United States tens of thousands of previously at-risk Afghans, reflections of our core American values to provide refuge to those in need.  We recognize the tremendous social, economic, and cultural contributions refugees make to communities across the United States, and we are committed to rebuilding a robust U.S. Refugee Admissions Program while ensuring its integrity and protecting our national security interests.  A robust refugee admissions program is a cornerstone of the President’s commitment to rebuilding a safe, orderly, and humane migration system.

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Resolution 1546 further noted the presence of the multinational force in Iraq and authorized it to take all necessary measures to contribute to security and stability in Iraq, in accordance with letters annexed to the resolution. Such letters provide, in part, that the multinational force and the Iraqi government will work in partnership to reach agreement on security and olicy issues, including policy on sensitive offensive operations. Resolution 1546 stated that the Security Council will review the mandate of the multinational force in 12 months or earlier if requested by the government of Iraq and that it will terminate the mandate if requested by the government of Iraq. As part of our broad effort to monitor Iraq reconstruction, which we undertook at the request of Congress, this report provides information on the status of the issues we have been monitoring, as well as key questions that will assist Congres in its oversight responsibilities. Specifically, this report focuses on issues associated with (1) resources, (2) security, (3) governance, and (4) essential services. For the essential services issue, we focused on the Army Corps of Engineers' Restore Iraqi Electricity project, a major component of the U.S. assistance effort to rebuild the power sector.As of the end of April 2004, about $58 billion in grants, loans, assets, and revenues from various sources had been made available or pledged to the relief and reconstruction of Iraq. Resource needs are expected to continue after the transfer of power to a sovereign Iraqi interim government. Of the funds available, the United States obligated about $8 billion of the available $24 billion in U.S. funds. The CPA obligated about $15.5 billion of the nearly $21 billion in available Iraqi funds. The international community pledged nearly $14 billion. In December 2003, the CPA put into effect an Iraqi-led process to coordinate reconstruction efforts. An October 2003 U.N./World Bank assessment noted that Iraq's ability to absorb resources as the country gains sovereignty and decision-making authority will be one of the most significant challenges to reconstruction. The security situation in Iraq has deteriorated since June 2003, with significant increases in attacks against the coalition and coalition partners. The increase in attacks has had a negative impact on military operations and the work of international civilian organizations in Iraq. As part of the effort to provide stability, the coalition plans to transfer security responsibilities from the multinational force to Iraqi security forces and to dissolve Iraqi militias operating outside the central government's control. During the escalation of violence that occurred during April 2004, these security forces collapsed in several locations. However, key elements of the CPA's transition and reintegration process remain to be finalized. With U.S. and others' assistance, Iraqis have taken control of government institutions at the national and subnational levels. National ministries are providing some services to citizens as their facilities are being rebuilt, reforms are being introduced, and their staffs trained. According to the head of the now-dissolved CPA, all ministries were under Iraqi authority as of the transfer of power on June 28, 2004. However, the security situation hinders the ability of the ministries to provide needed services and maintain daily operations. To reform the rule of law, ongoing efforts have begun to establish a functioning independent judiciary, although courts are not at their pre-war capacity. However, efforts to rebuild Iraq's judicial system and restore the rule of law face multiple challenges. U.S. officials said that rehabilitating and reforming Iraq's judicial system will likely take years. 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