The Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS

Office of the Spokesperson

At the Global Coalition Ministerial in Rome on June 28, the U.S. Department of State wishes to reaffirm its commitment to the Coalition and its goals. The 83-member Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS has worked diligently since 2014 to reduce the threat ISIS poses to international security and our homelands. The Coalition’s combined efforts have diminished ISIS’ military capability, territorial control, leadership, financial resources, and online influence. Members are united in common cause to defeat ISIS through a robust approach, including working by, with, and through local partners for military missions; supporting the stabilization of the territory liberated from ISIS; and enhancing international cooperation against ISIS’ global objectives through information sharing, law enforcement cooperation, severing ISIS’ financing, countering terrorist recruitment, and neutralizing ISIS’ narrative. The Coalition is also engaged in efforts to provide needs-based humanitarian aid assistance to communities suffering from displacement and conflict, and supporting stabilization efforts in territory liberated from ISIS.

The Ministerial

Secretary Blinken will join Italian Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation Luigi Di Maio in co-hosting a meeting of the Foreign Ministers of the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS. It will be the first in-person Ministerial of the Global Coalition since February 6, 2019. This will be an opportunity for the Foreign Ministers of the Coalition, led by the United States, to discuss ways to sustain pressure on ISIS remnants in Iraq and Syria, and to counter ISIS’s global networks, primarily in Africa. The Coalition will also assess priorities for its five lines of effort: stabilization, foreign terrorist fighters, counter-ISIS financing, political-military consultations, and counter-messaging efforts.

Fast Facts

Since 2014, the Coalition has carried out a comprehensive strategy to destroy and degrade ISIS. Milestones include:

  • Removing Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in October 2019 and scores of ISIS leaders;
  • Destroying 100 percent of ISIS’s fraudulent territorial “caliphate;”
  • Liberating over 42,000 square miles and supporting the safe and voluntary return of nearly 8 million people from ISIS’s brutal rule;
  • Addressing the root causes of support for ISIS through targeted justice and accountability assistance to local communities and survivors of ISIS atrocities;
  • Expanding the Coalition’s global reach to 83 members, adding 4 partners since the last Ministerial – Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mauritania, and Yemen.
Africa
Cameroon
Central African Republic
Chad
Democratic Republic of Congo
Djibouti
Egypt
Ethiopia
Guinea
Kenya
Libya
Mauritania
Morocco
Niger
Nigeria
Somalia
Tunisia
Americas
Canada
Panama
United States

Institutions
Arab League
CEN-SAD
EU
INTERPOL
NATO

Asia Pacific
Afghanistan
Australia
Fiji
Japan
Malaysia
New Zealand
Philippines
Singapore
South Korea
Taiwan

Europe
Albania
Austria
Belgium
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Georgia
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Italy
Kosovo
Latvia
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Moldova
Montenegro
Netherlands
North Macedonia Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Serbia
Slovakia
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Turkey
Ukraine
United Kingdom
Middle East
Bahrain
Iraq
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Oman
Qatar
Saudi Arabia
United Arab Emirates
Yemen

Coalition Members: 83 members, 78 nations, 5 institutions

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