October 21, 2021

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The Election of Todd Buchwald to the UN Committee Against Torture

8 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

I would like to congratulate Todd Buchwald on his election to serve as an independent expert on the UN Committee Against Torture for the 2022-2025 term.  Advancing human rights and rule of law through multilateral re-engagement is a top priority for the United States, and in our pursuit of those ideals at home and around the world, we were proud to nominate Professor Buchwald.  The Committee Against Torture is an important UN platform for addressing torture and is charged with the critical work of monitoring 171 States parties’ compliance with their treaty obligations under the Convention Against Torture.  The United States takes seriously its obligations as a State Party to this treaty and submitted its sixth periodic report to the Committee on September 24.

Professor Buchwald is a distinguished scholar, lecturer, and professor of international law who previously served as the U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Criminal Justice with a focus on justice and accountability for atrocities.  This followed an acclaimed legal career with over 30 years in government and private practice, including as Assistant Legal Adviser of the State Department with a focus on United Nations affairs and as an Attorney in the Office of White House Counsel.  I am confident he will continue to bring the important perspective of American jurisprudence towards the goal of preventing torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment internationally.

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