September 27, 2021

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The Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations Announces Award for Worldwide Architectural and Engineering Support Services

13 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The Department of State’s Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO) has selected 12 Architectural and Engineering (A/E) firms for the Worldwide Architectural and Engineering Support Services Indefinite Delivery / Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ). Selected from the distinguished stage one shortlist of 25 firms, these teams will provide program-level process- and procedure-improvement support, existing facilities surveys and analyses, and other project-specific support such as master plans, security mitigation studies, site expansion studies, project phasing analysis, and historic structures surveys.

The selected firms are:

AECOM Services, Inc.
Buro Happold Engineering
Davis Brody Bond
Arthur Gensler, Jr. & Associates, Inc. (dba Gensler)
HDR KCCT JV
Jacobs Government Services Company
Lake Flato Architects
The Mason & Hanger Group, Inc.
Moore Ruble Yudell Architects & Planners
ODA-Architecture, P.C.
SmithGroup, Inc.
WXY Architecture + Urban Design

Since the start of the Department’s Capital Security Construction Program in 1999, OBO has completed 167 new diplomatic facilities. OBO currently has more than 50 active projects, either in design or under construction worldwide.

OBO provides safe, secure, functional, and resilient facilities that positively represent the United States to other nations and that support U.S. diplomats in advancing U.S. foreign policy objectives abroad.

For further information, please contact Christine Foushee at FousheeCT@state.gov or visit www.state.gov/obo.

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