October 21, 2021

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The Bahamas Independence Day

16 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I congratulate the Commonwealth of The Bahamas as you celebrate your independence.

The longstanding partnership between the United States and The Bahamas has never been stronger.  While the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged both our countries, our people have risen to that challenge.  There is still much to do, in The Bahamas and throughout the Caribbean, and the United States will remain a steadfast and reliable partner as we work together to advance our shared priorities.

We will stand with you as you continue to address the pandemic, as you rebuild from Hurricane Dorian, and as you work to support human rights in the region.  Efforts such as the U.S.-Caribbean Resilience Partnership, the Caribbean Energy Security Initiative, and the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative are testament to our willingness to bolster cooperation on renewable energy, regional security, and resilience to the climate crisis.

On the occasion of your 48th year as an independent nation, the United States and its people wish the people of The Bahamas prosperity and happiness over the year to come.

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