The 10th Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Ten years ago, Japan suffered unimaginable tragedy following the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. The United States stands in solidarity with Japan to remember those lost and still missing, and to honor the resilience of the Japanese people who rebuilt their homes, their livelihoods, and their communities.

As a steadfast ally, Japan has consistently provided assistance to the United States in times of need. Japan was one of the first countries to offer assistance following the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina.

Americans are proud to have supported Japan in the aftermath of the March 11 disaster. Just hours after the earthquake and tsunami struck, our two countries launched “Operation Tomodachi” and carried out search, rescue, and recovery efforts. At the peak of Operation Tomodachi, the United States had 24,000 personnel, 190 aircraft, and 24 Navy ships supporting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts – a reflection of our enduring commitment to and bond with the people of Japan.

For over six decades, the U.S.-Japan Alliance has been the cornerstone of peace, security, and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific region and around the world. The American and Japanese people share an unwavering friendship, and we will continue to stand strong together in the face of any adversity to come.

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  • Information Environment: DOD Operations Need Enhanced Leadership and Integration of Capabilities
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found At its core, information operations (IO) are the integration of information-related capabilities during military operations to influence, disrupt, corrupt, or usurp the decision making of adversaries and potential adversaries while protecting our own. (See figure.) For example, in seeking to facilitate safe and orderly humanitarian assistance, the Department of Defense (DOD) would conduct IO by influencing host nation and regional cooperation through the integration of public affairs activities and military information support operations. Information Operations and Selected Information-Related Capabilities GAO found, in 2019, that DOD had made limited progress in implementing the 2016 DOD IO strategy and faced a number of challenges in overseeing the IO enterprise and integrating its IO capabilities. Specifically: In seeking to implement the strategy, DOD had not developed an implementation plan or an investment framework to identify planning priorities to address IO gaps. DOD has established department-wide IO roles and responsibilities and assigned most oversight responsibilities to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. The Under Secretary had exercised some responsibilities, such as establishing an executive steering group. However, the Under Secretary had not fulfilled other IO oversight responsibilities, such as conducting an assessment of needed tasks, workload, and resources. Instead, the Under Secretary delegated these responsibilities to an official whose primary responsibilities are focused on special operations and combatting terrorism. DOD had integrated information-related capabilities in some military operations, but had not conducted a posture review to assess IO challenges. Conducting a comprehensive posture review to fully assess challenges would assist DOD in effectively operating while using information-related capabilities. Why GAO Did This Study U.S. potential adversaries—including near-peer competitors Russia and China—are using information to achieve objectives below the threshold of armed conflict. DOD can use information operations to counter these activities. This testimony summarizes GAO's past work related to DOD's IO capabilities. Specifically, it discusses: (1) DOD's information operation terms and concept, and (2) DOD's actions to implement the 2016 DOD IO strategy and address oversight and integration challenges. This statement is based on GAO's August and October 2019 reports (GAO-19-510C and GAO-20-51SU) and updates conducted in April 2021.
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