The 10th Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Ten years ago, Japan suffered unimaginable tragedy following the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. The United States stands in solidarity with Japan to remember those lost and still missing, and to honor the resilience of the Japanese people who rebuilt their homes, their livelihoods, and their communities.

As a steadfast ally, Japan has consistently provided assistance to the United States in times of need. Japan was one of the first countries to offer assistance following the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina.

Americans are proud to have supported Japan in the aftermath of the March 11 disaster. Just hours after the earthquake and tsunami struck, our two countries launched “Operation Tomodachi” and carried out search, rescue, and recovery efforts. At the peak of Operation Tomodachi, the United States had 24,000 personnel, 190 aircraft, and 24 Navy ships supporting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts – a reflection of our enduring commitment to and bond with the people of Japan.

For over six decades, the U.S.-Japan Alliance has been the cornerstone of peace, security, and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific region and around the world. The American and Japanese people share an unwavering friendship, and we will continue to stand strong together in the face of any adversity to come.

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