October 19, 2021

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Texas Man Sentenced to Prison for Filing False Tax Returns with Stolen Identities

14 min read
<div>A Texas man was sentenced to 70 months in prison today for conspiring to commit wire fraud, wire fraud and aggravated identity theft, in connection with a scheme to file false tax returns using stolen identities.</div>
A Texas man was sentenced to 70 months in prison today for conspiring to commit wire fraud, wire fraud and aggravated identity theft, in connection with a scheme to file false tax returns using stolen identities.

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