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The 2020-2021 Supreme Court fellows, clockwise from top left, Allison A. Bruff, Sarah Alsaden, Hannah M. Solomon-Strauss, and Kathleen Foley. Images are from the collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.

Four new U.S. Supreme Court fellows are set to begin their 2020-2021 fellowships in September and will be working virtually during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Hannah M. Solomon-Strauss, previously a law clerk for Judge Jane Kelly, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, is assigned to the Supreme Court’s Office of the Counselor to the Chief Justice.

Sarah Alsaden joins the program from the federal court for the Southern District of Ohio, where she clerked for Judge Algenon L. Marbley. She is assigned to the Federal Judicial Center, the Judiciary’s education and research arm.

Allison A. Bruff, who served as the rules law clerk for Arizona District Judge David G. Campbell, who chairs the Judicial Conference Committee on the Rules of Practice and Procedure, is assigned to the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

Kathleen Foley, a former law clerk for Judge Robert L. Wilkins, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, was selected to work with the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.

The Supreme Court Fellows Program, established by the late Chief Justice Warren E. Burger in 1973, provides participants the opportunity to gain greater understanding of the federal Judiciary.  Fellows work alongside top officials in the judicial branch on projects that further the goals of the Judiciary.

In the words of Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., the program offers “a unique opportunity for exceptional individuals to contribute to the administration of justice at the national level.”

The fellows are selected by a commission composed of nine members selected by the Chief Justice. Additional background information on each of the 2020-2021 Supreme Court fellows and the program’s history is available online.