October 26, 2021

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Statement by Pamela Karlan, Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General of the Civil Rights Division

19 min read
<div>“The United States is currently facing unprecedented challenges, some of which are fueling increased bigotry and hatred. Hate crimes cannot be tolerated in our country, and the Department of Justice will continue to put all necessary resources toward protecting our neighbors and our communities from these heinous acts.</div>
“The United States is currently facing unprecedented challenges, some of which are fueling increased bigotry and hatred. Hate crimes cannot be tolerated in our country, and the Department of Justice will continue to put all necessary resources toward protecting our neighbors and our communities from these heinous acts.

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