October 18, 2021

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St. Kitts and Nevis Independence Day 

11 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the government of the United States and the American people, I congratulate the people of the Federation of Saint Christopher and Nevis on the 38th anniversary of your independence. 

The United States is committed to helping St. Kitts and Nevis overcome the COVID-19 pandemic and rebuild our economies.  Through donations of vaccines, support for the COVAX facility, and provision of medical supplies to St. Kitts and Nevis, we demonstrate our resolve to defeat this virus together.  Likewise, we will continue to work through the Small and Less Populous Island Economies Initiative and the Caribbean Basin Security Initiative to create a more inclusive, prosperous economy and cooperate on security and climate change issues. 

The United States values the friendship between our two countries and wishes the citizens of St. Kitts and Nevis a happy Independence Day. 

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