September 22, 2021

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Special Envoy for Iran Robert Malley’s Travel to Moscow and Paris

11 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Special Envoy Malley and a small delegation will be travelling to Moscow and Paris from 7-10 September for consultations with our Russian and European partners on Iran’s nuclear program and the need to quickly reach and implement an understanding on a mutual return to compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.

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