October 18, 2021

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Sixth Anniversary of Iran’s Wrongful Detention of Siamak Namazi

11 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Today marks six years that Iran has wrongfully detained Siamak Namazi, a U.S. citizen who has committed no crime and has been held by the Iranian government for the better part of a decade.

In 2016, Siamak’s father, Baquer, traveled to Iran to help free his son.  In retaliation, the Iranian government arrested Baquer as well.  The Iranian government sentenced both father and son to ten years in prison.  Now 84 years old, without any charge pending against him, and in dire need of medical attention, Baquer remains held by the Iranian government, which refuses to allow him to depart Iran. 

I appreciated the opportunity to meet with Siamak’s brother and Baquer’s son Babak today.  The Iranian government continues to subject the entire Namazi family to unimaginable abuse.  Through it all, the Namazis have shown remarkable courage. 

The United States is committed to securing Siamak and Baquer’s freedom as soon as possible, as well as that of the other U.S. citizens wrongfully detained in Iran.

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

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