Seventh U.S.-Thailand Strategic Dialogue

Office of the Spokesperson

Senior delegations representing the United States and Thailand met virtually on May 21, 2021, for the Seventh U.S.-Thailand Strategic Dialogue.  Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Atul Keshap led the U.S. delegation, and Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Thani Thongphakdi led the Thai delegation.

The Strategic Dialogue is an integral part of the enduring U.S.-Thai relationship, which has spanned over two centuries and covers political, security, and economic cooperation.  The Dialogue addressed a wide variety of issues of mutual interest, including regional security, economic prosperity, health cooperation, and joint efforts to combat transnational crime.  Both sides reaffirmed the longstanding commitment to the U.S.-Thai defense alliance, which benefits both nations and supports peace and prosperity across the Indo-Pacific region.

The two delegations explored ways to deepen cooperation in areas, including climate change and clean energy, business, technology, and people-to-people connections.  The United States reiterated its commitment to the people of Thailand in our fight against COVID-19, and thus far has provided nearly $30 million in health-related assistance to Thailand.  Both sides highlighted the importance of cooperation in regional forums including the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, ASEAN, and the Mekong-U.S. Partnership.

The United States underscored the importance of protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms. The United States also expressed deep concern about the ongoing crisis in Burma.

The two sides agreed on the benefit of continued high-level engagements and looked forward to the next U.S.-Thailand Strategic Dialogue.

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  • Man-Made Chemicals and Potential Health Risks: EPA Has Completed Some Regulatory-Related Actions for PFAS
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  • K-12 Education: School Districts Need Better Information to Help Improve Access for People with Disabilities
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