Serbia Travel Advisory

Reconsider travel to Serbia due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Serbia due to COVID-19.

Serbia has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and universities). Other improved conditions have been reported within Serbia. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Serbia.

Additionally, exercise increased caution in Serbia due to crime.

Violence associated with organized crime and high-profile sporting events in Serbia is common.

Organized criminal activities such as car bombings and assassinations by shooting can occur in all areas at any time.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Serbia:

  • See the U.S. Embassy’s web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Do not answer your door at your hotel/residence unless you know who it is.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave the original in your hotel safe.
  • Provide your itinerary to a family member or friend.
  • Monitor local media.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Serbia.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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