September 27, 2021

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Secretary Pompeo’s Video Remarks at the Prague 5G Security Conference 2020

19 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

Prague 5G Security Conference 2020

Video Remarks

Hello, everyone. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo here.

Prime Minister Babiš, thank you for inviting me to speak today. It was a privilege last month to visit your beautiful country in person.

The Czech Republic has been a leader when it comes to confronting the threats posed by the Chinese Communist Party and its technology companies.

Last year’s first 5G Security Conference was a pivotal moment in turning the tide against these untrusted vendors. Today’s conference provides yet another example of that leadership.

The U.S. has done our part, too.

In addition to 5G Clean Path, we’ve launched the Clean Network Initiative – five new lines of effort to safeguard our citizens’ privacy and our companies’ sensitive information from untrusted vendors. The Clean Network’s comprehensive approach is rooted in the Prague Proposals, and other internationally accepted digital trust standards.

Around the world, we’re seeing a coalition of partners join us.

More than 30 countries and their carriers have joined the Clean Network, and many of the world’s biggest telecommunications companies are becoming Clean Telcos.

We want all of you attending today to join us, too. I’m happy to announce that the U.S. government is expanding globally the Digital Connectivity and Cybersecurity Partnership, which I launched in 2018.

This program promotes increased connectivity and a competitive global marketplace for trusted 5G vendors.

The EU’s 5G Toolbox, which ensures the security of its 5G networks, is another initiative the U.S. strongly supports.Together, we’ve built so much momentum since last year’s conference.

The United States is committed to collaborating with like minded countries to deny malign actors such as the CCP access to our nations’ sensitive data.

Technology must advance freedom. So I call on all freedom-loving countries to join the U.S. and the growing list of nations who are securing their 5G networks against untrusted vendors, and the authoritarian governments behind them.

Thank you, and I wish you all a productive conference.

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