September 28, 2021

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Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with Islamic Republic of Afghanistan’s Negotiating Team

7 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo met today with the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan’s negotiating team in Doha, Qatar.  Secretary Pompeo commended both sides for continuing to negotiate and for the progress they have made.  Secretary Pompeo and the negotiators discussed ways to reduce violence, and he encouraged expedited discussions on a political roadmap and a permanent and comprehensive ceasefire.  Secretary Pompeo reiterated that the people of Afghanistan expect and deserve to live in peace and security after 40 years of war and bloodshed.

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