Secretary Pompeo’s Meeting with Ecuadoran Foreign Minister Gallegos

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo met with Ecuadoran Foreign Minister Luis Gallegos today in Washington, DC.  Secretary Pompeo and Foreign Minister Gallegos discussed collaboration on bilateral priorities, including anti-corruption efforts, security issues, and economic ties.  Secretary Pompeo recognized the Government of Ecuador’s commitment to strengthen democracy and to ensure a free, fair, and transparent election in February.  The Secretary expressed strong U.S. support for Ecuador’s efforts to ensure that fishing vessels do not engage in illegal, unregulated, and unreported fishing in Ecuador’s waters and to promote regional cooperation on the issue.  Secretary Pompeo and Foreign Minister Gallegos discussed driving economic growth through the digital economy, combatting misinformation and disinformation, and the importance of a digital network free of untrusted communications equipment providers.  The Secretary also pledged to continue providing generous health-care assistance to protect the people of both our countries.

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In Crime News
    Rodney Allen, 43, of Beaufort, South Carolina, was sentenced today in federal court in Jacksonville, Florida, to 24 months in prison. Allen previously pleaded guilty to one count of intimidating and interfering with the employees of an abortion clinic by making a bomb threat and one count of making false statements to a Special Agent with the FBI.
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    In Crime News
    The Justice Department announced today that it has reached a settlement to resolve a claim that Night and Day Dental Inc. discriminated against a woman with HIV in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 
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