Secretary Pompeo’s Call with Uzbekistan Foreign Minister Kamilov

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Principal Deputy Spokesperson Cale Brown:‎

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo spoke today with Uzbekistan Foreign Minister Abdulaziz Kamilov.  Secretary Pompeo reaffirmed U.S. steadfast support for Uzbekistan’s sovereignty, territorial integrity and independence, and for President Mirziyoyev’s reform agenda.  The Secretary and Foreign Minister reflected on the progress of human rights reforms, including broadening religious freedom, combatting trafficking in persons, and expanding space for civil society and journalists.  The Secretary and the Foreign Minister also discussed opportunities for U.S. exporters and investors as Uzbekistan pursues market-oriented policies and privatization.

Reflecting on the growing U.S. – Uzbekistan partnership and strategic alignment, Secretary Pompeo and Foreign Minister Kamilov lauded their governments’ decision to elevate annual bilateral political consultations to a Strategic Partnership Dialogue.  Within this Dialogue, the United States and Uzbekistan will pursue closer cooperation across political, security, economic, and human dimensions.

 

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