October 18, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Trilateral Meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Motegi and Republic of Korea Foreign Minister Chung

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken participated in a trilateral ministerial with Republic of Korea Foreign Minister Chung Eui-yong and Japanese Foreign Minister Motegi Toshimitsu today in New York City on the margins of the UN General Assembly. The Secretary and the Foreign Ministers highlighted the global scope of U.S.-Japan-ROK cooperation based upon our shared values, as well as our commitment to preserving and promoting regional peace, stability, and prosperity.  The discussion included ways to deepen cooperation between our countries through multilateral efforts to tackle the pressing global challenges, such as combatting the climate crisis and securing supply chains. Secretary Blinken reaffirmed the United States’ commitment to continued consultation and cooperation with the ROK and Japan in working toward the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.  Secretary Blinken also called for an immediate end to the violence in Burma and urged the Burmese regime to release all those unjustly detained and restore Burma’s path to democracy.

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