September 27, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Participation in the East Asia Summit Foreign Ministers’ Meeting

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with foreign ministers of the East Asia Summit (EAS) nations and the ASEAN Secretary General during the EAS Foreign Ministers’ Meeting.  The Secretary reaffirmed the United States’ commitment to ASEAN and the EAS, underscoring the essential role of ASEAN-centered fora in the U.S. vision for a free and open Indo-Pacific.  The Secretary and EAS foreign ministers discussed supporting implementation of the ASEAN Outlook on the Indo-Pacific and addressing pressing regional and international challenges, including combatting the COVID-19 pandemic and upholding the rules-based international order.

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