October 21, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Participation in Ministerial on Libya

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken today participated in a ministerial on Libya on the margins of the UN General Assembly hosted by France, Germany, and Italy.  In attendance were foreign ministers of participants in the Berlin Process as well as Libya’s regional neighbors and UN representatives.

Secretary Blinken affirmed U.S. support for a sovereign, stable, unified, and secure Libya free from foreign interference.

The Secretary emphasized U.S. support for Libya’s presidential and parliamentary elections on December 24 and urged Libya’s leaders to take the steps necessary to ensure free and fair elections as outlined by the Libyan Political Dialogue Forum roadmap, including the need for agreement on a constitutional and legal framework.

Secretary Blinken underscored U.S. support for full implementation of the Libyan October 2020 ceasefire, including the removal of all foreign forces and mercenaries as called for in UN Security Council Resolution 2570.

The Secretary also stressed U.S. support for renewal of the UN Human Rights Council Independent Fact Finding Mission on Libya’s work to document human rights abuses and violations of international humanitarian law, as well as the need for unhindered access for the Mission.

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