Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with South African Foreign Minister Pandor

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with South African Foreign Minister Naledi Pandor in London. Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Pandor underscored the need to expand global COVID-19 vaccine production and to cooperate on climate ambition and regional security issues such as the ongoing violence by ISIS-Mozambique. Secretary Blinken conveyed the importance of multilateral organizations in addressing humanitarian and human rights crises, including in Ethiopia’s Tigray region. Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Pandor reiterated their commitment to advance planning for a bilateral Strategic Dialogue.

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