Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Republic of Korea Foreign Minister Chung

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Today in Seoul, Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met with Republic of Korea (ROK) Foreign Minister Chung Eui-yong.  Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Chung reaffirmed that the U.S.-ROK Alliance is the linchpin of peace, security, and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific and around the world and discussed cooperation on a broad range of global issues.  The Secretary and the Foreign Minister emphasized that North Korean nuclear and ballistic missile issues are a priority for the Alliance, and reaffirmed a shared commitment to address and resolve these issues.  They discussed the United States’ ongoing DPRK policy review and highlighted our shared commitment to strengthening the Alliance, defending against any use of force, and keeping America, the ROK, and our allies safe.  They also affirmed the importance of trilateral cooperation among the United States, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in ensuring a free and open Indo-Pacific.  The Secretary and the Foreign Minister committed to closely coordinating on all issues related to the Korean Peninsula, tackling COVID-19, pressing the military in Burma to restore the democratically elected government, and combatting the climate crisis.

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    [Read More…]
  • Four sentenced for roles in ransom scheme
    In Justice News
    Four U.S. citizens have [Read More…]
  • Man Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison for Attempting to Provide Material Support to ISIS
    In Crime News
    A New York man was sentenced today to 20 years in prison for attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham, aka ISIS. Zachary Clark, aka Umar Kabir, Umar Shishani and Abu Talha, 42, of Brooklyn, New York, pleaded guilty in August 2020 to one count of attempting to provide material support or resources to a designated foreign terrorist organization, namely, ISIS.
    [Read More…]
  • Compounding Pharmacy Mogul Sentenced for Multimillion-Dollar Health Care Fraud Scheme
    In Crime News
    A Mississippi businessman was sentenced today for his role in a multimillion-dollar scheme to defraud TRICARE, the health care benefit program serving U.S. military, veterans, and their respective family members, as well as private health care benefit programs.
    [Read More…]
  • Three Foreign Nationals Charged with Conspiring to Provide Material Support to ISIS
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department announced today that three Sri Lankan citizens have been charged with terrorism offenses, including conspiring to provide material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization (ISIS).  The men were part of a group of ISIS supporters which called itself “ISIS in Sri Lanka.”  That group is responsible for the 2019 Easter attacks in the South Asian nation of Sri Lanka, which killed 268 people, including five U.S. citizens, and injured over 500 others, according to a federal criminal complaint unsealed today.
    [Read More…]
  • Seven North Carolina Tax Preparers Plead Guilty to Conspiring to Defraud the IRS
    In Crime News
    Seven Charlotte, North Carolina tax return preparers pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the United States by preparing and filing false tax returns, announced Principal Deputy Assistant General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division, U.S. Attorney R. Andrew Murray for the Western District of North Carolina, and Special Agent in Charge Matthew D. Line of the Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI).
    [Read More…]
  • Facing Long Post-Hurricane Recovery, Court in La. Gets Help From Friends
    In U.S Courts
    Hurricane Laura has left a lasting impact on the Western Louisiana community of Lake Charles, and the federal courthouse could be closed a year or more. Despite the disarray, courts in New Orleans, Texas, and even Alaska have reached out to support the court’s staff in getting back on their feet.  
    [Read More…]
  • The United States Supports the Voices of the Venezuelan People
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • Briefing With Assistant Secretary for African Affairs Tibor P. Nagy and U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia Michael A. Raynor on the Situation in Ethiopia’s Tigray Region
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Tibor P. Nagy, Jr., [Read More…]