Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Motegi and Republic of Korea Foreign Minister Chung

Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Japanese Foreign Minister Motegi Toshimitsu and Republic of Korea Foreign Minister Chung Eui-yong in London to promote trilateral solidarity and discuss shared concerns about North Korea’s nuclear and ballistic missile programs. The Secretary and the Ministers reaffirmed their commitment to concerted trilateral cooperation toward denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, as well as other issues of mutual interest. They also agreed on the imperative of fully implementing relevant UN Security Council resolutions by UN member states, including North Korea, preventing proliferation, and cooperating to strengthen deterrence and maintain peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula.

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